Personal Flexibility (PFL) Calling

‘A flexible mind has a better chance to think differently and take a unique path in the life journey.’ Pearl Zhu

Have you seen the Jim Carey movie ‘Yes Man’ (2008, Warner Bros)? I thought it was a great idea to base a movie on, back when it came out. Essentially, the movie’s message is that by embracing the power of yes (being more flexible) in our personal lives, we can be happier, both in our personal and professional lives.

Perhaps the best gateways we encounter in life are those that shimmer & sparkle with possibility – career choices, lifestyle choices, parenthood, new friendships, important event invitations, romantic encounters, volunteer roles as leadership opportunities. The chance to work in another country. The chance to embark on a business start up.

Perhaps also, the best people to trust in life are the ‘type P’s for which it is a risk to trust them – type P’s being a small risk with big possibilities. Not ‘type R’s’ – a big risk with small possibilities. The trick is first finding them. And then distinguishing between the two types.

A question for you: in our lives, should we try and have high hopes, but low expectations? What’s your view?

And how does having high hopes but low expectations relate to personal flexibility? Perhaps the best chance for personal happiness & success, is to be flexible on hope. Be thorough in your preparation. Be skilful in your follow through too. But remain rigid & low in your expectations? The military have an acronym for it – snarfu!

Some everyday examples of personal flexibility:

  • When some people step outside their front door, they carry clothing for different weather conditions.
  • Some people sacrifice and save money ‘for a rainy day’. And may use a savings account (or piggy bank) with flexible access, for the same reason.
  • Parents tell their children to study hard & gain qualifications. Ones that will be valued by more than one employer.
  • People reserve their judgement when they meet strangers.
  • Some people commit to things one step at a time, to ‘keep their options open’.
  • Some people store up political favours or wealth, as a form of future insurance.
  • Some people prize physical flexibility, perhaps indulging in dance, yoga, gymnastics or martial arts.
  • People move cities or countries, hoping to take advantage of job opportunities in other locations.
  • People adjust their mode of living as their needs change. For example, as a child or teenager, living with their parents. Living in student-share accommodation while studying At university. Living in a shared flat while starting their career. Living in nuclear-family accommodation to raise a family. Downsizing their accommodation needs when the children leave home. Moving into a care home when needing supervised care.
  • People date strangers. They simultaneously try to present their best side, meet in a public place and ‘try on different potential partners for size.’
  • Adventurous people seek out other places to experience other cultures and value systems.
  • Some wealthy old people delay making a bequest. When tactfully asked by fundraisers why they delay, they reply ‘I might change my mind’.
  • Close-knit communities create food stockpiles, seed stores and water wells, to cope with supply shortages or uncertain future weather conditions.
  • Some communities create time capsules, music, dance, drama, museums, written diaries, film and photographs. They see this as a way to preserve their cultural identity in an uncertain world.
  • We populate the planet with ever more people to preserve and enhance human society. Just in case.

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In short, flexibility isn’t a novel concept. We’ve been practising it and paying lip service to it for years! What is new, or at least overdue, is creating a framework for both personal & business flexibility. And some new language about flexibility the subject. Long overdue in my view.

Enough for now. If you find these blogs useful, please spread the word for others to read them and comment too.

Simon

The Personal Flexibility Journey Begins…

‘The measure of intelligence is the ability to change.’ Albert Einstein

‘If you’re not stubborn, you’ll give up on experiments too soon. And if you’re not flexible, you’ll pound your head against the wall and you won’t see a different solution to a problem you’re trying to solve.’ Jeff Bezos

Hi and welcome to my new blog on personal flexibility (PFL). I’m excited to get this blog underway, as there’s lots to say and lots of ideas to help you.

PFL is a subject much bigger than just agility or stretching techniques. Personal Flexibility can help you:

  • manage changes,
  • manage uncertainty,
  • achieve personal growth,
  • become more resilient,
  • cope with some of life’s set backs.

Firstly, let’s separate flexibility into two strands. One is Personal Flexibility (PFL). The other is Business Flexibility (BFL).

The main focus of this blog is going to be on personal flexibility, since it’s been overlooked even more than business flexibility.

Business flexibility is a related & complimentary tool. If you are interested in Business Flexibility – feel free to visit my website www.sleicest-consulting.org.uk . There’s also a large handbook on business FL that I’ve developed behind that.

So what is personal flexibility? Essentially, it’s about developing options and extra capacity in your life. Both can be developed manually. Or you can utilise flexiscribes (things that code for flexibility). But more about that in a later blog.  Closely related is having the ability to use the PFL you possess.

Why does flexibility matter? We focus a lot on action & goals. We aren’t so good at building a winning hand in the first place. Or buying sufficient time to develop a better solution.

Flexibility gives you more freedom on what to do. And when to act.

Having more flexibility doesn’t itself cause indecision. For example, you might delay an important decision while you wait for more information. Likewise, saying to yourself ‘I can be anything I want to be’ isn’t the same as having tangible options to open various doors.

Perhaps take a moment at this point, to reflect on a few negative experiences you’ve had in your life (job redundancy, sibling rivalry, dating?). Now imagine if you’d built up wider options and chosen amongst them instead. Of course, you can’t be certain what would have happened. But you probably have a better idea of the regrets you’d have avoided. True?

How can you practice PFL? Thinking flexibly is part of it – see a later blog on this. Gather and manage a personal portfolio of options. Build extra capacity among the resources you do control. Benchmark and actively monitor your stocks of PFL. Use your influence by exercising your options. Or not. Feel uplifted and empowered. Then press the repeat button.

When should you practice PFL? When you expect or encounter uncertainty. When you want growth. When you want to manage the existing risks in your life better. And when you want to change things for the better. Having PFL can make you happier & more successful at various points in your life, so stick with it!

I’ll try and publish regular blogs on Personal Flexibility, so please return to this site for regular updates. In time, I’ll include some product/service reviews of stuff that has flexibility at its core. And referrals to what others are saying about flexibility. My aim to keep the site positive, as well as free of politics & religion.

Simon